Student work

Stories produced in my classes

 
Photo: Elizabeth Sloan

Photo: Elizabeth Sloan

in-depth reporting: 2018 regional SPJ Mark of excellence winner

Wisconsin votes (or Not): High Stakes for the 2018 Midterms

Photo courtesy: Kristyna Mulheron

Photo courtesy: Kristyna Mulheron

Audio storytelling: 2018 national SPJ Mark of excellence winner

Choosing Abortion: Honest Reflections on a Private Decision

Photo: Mary Jo Contino

Photo: Mary Jo Contino

in-depth reporting: 2017 regional SPJ Mark of excellence winner

‘Awful’ UW-Milwaukee Transgender Locker Room Policy Remains Under Wraps

Photo: Sabrina Johnkins

Photo: Sabrina Johnkins

Audio storytelling: 2018 regional sPJ mark of excellence finalist

A mother and daughter take off on a revealing road trip from Wisconsin to the Gulf Coast.

Photo: Lauren Keene

Photo: Lauren Keene

audio storytelling: 2018 regional SPJ mark of excellence winner

At the 2018 gun march in Washington, D.C., seasoned protesters hoped that this time, their voices would be heard.

Photo: Marla Smith

Photo: Marla Smith

Audio storytelling: faces of uwm

In the Faces of UWM audio profile series, students reveal fun and poignant stuff about their lives. 

Photo courtesy: DeGeorge family

Photo courtesy: DeGeorge family

audio storytelling: intimate conversations

Mark DeGeorge has one son, his namesake. That son is transitioning to become his daughter. They talked about how the father-son dynamic shaped their relationship and how a gender transition will change it. 

Photo courtesy: Rukiya Stewart

Photo courtesy: Rukiya Stewart

audio storytelling: stories close to home

 In StoryCorps style, entry-level journalism students record conversations with friends and family over Thanksgiving weekends in 2018, 2017 and 2016.

Photo courtesy: Phillips family

Photo courtesy: Phillips family

audio storytelling: intimate conversations

Aijia Phillips was just 2 years old when her father, George Phillips Jr., was shot and killed in Milwaukee on August 14, 2012. Three years later, Aijia and her aunt, journalism student Jakayla Phillips, recall Aijia's handful of memories.